JUBILEE CULTURAL ROUTES

COMMITMENT AND HOLINESS. IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA AND FILIPPO NERI

You are along the route: COMMITMENT AND HOLINESS. IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA AND FILIPPO NERI

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Thought up as a narrative walk, and thus exhausting in appearance, the itinerary is suited to any day of the week. We have included all the places of interest in the itinerary, including those which can only be visited inside – for those who may be interested – at certain times or by advance booking.
We advise you to visit St. Ignatius, which is open every day, and, if you are able to organise your visit in advance, S. Filippo Neri as well, although this must be booked in advance.

The sixteenth century was rich in great artistic and cultural milestones, but was also a tormented and contradictory period. The heart of Rome still preserves the most suggestive places in the exceptional lifetimes of two great protagonists of the religious and spiritual lifestyle of the time: Ignatius of Loyola and Filippo Neri, the former founder of the Company of Jesus, the latter of the Congregation of the Oratory. They were very different men, albeit very close, and were canonised by Pope Gregory XV on the same day: 16 March 1622.
Ignatius created a true army of missionaries, who initially set off to spread the Gospel in new lands. He shared his famous Spiritual Exercises with humanists and Cardinals, and at the same time promoted teaching and education, making them the fulcrum of the activities of the order and his own main means of spreading his word.
The Jesuits offered a solid doctrine and strict education, but Filippo, the “joyous saint”, attracted orphans and street children to him with his “familiarity and homeliness”, bringing them closer to the Church by means of games and song, the founding basis of the Oratory.
Ignatius was taciturn, a hater of gossip, and rigid; the latter loved to talk, and was an jovial and lovable joker. Yet the two were linked by reciprocal affection and respect for each other, as confirmed by the anecdotes in their contemporary biographies. They shared the same desire for reformation, which became the symbol of that contracting period in which the Church was in search of a new identity
In the antechamber to the room in which Ignatius died on 31 July 1556, there is still a painting depicting the two heroes of the “Roman reformation” united in brotherly love.

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